Monday, April 4, 2011

Paddy's Clam House - New York City

Lunch for $1.29 sounds good to me. So does the 5-course lobster dinner. I would suggest that we meet there for lunch, but Paddy's has been closed for many years.


This is from New York City - Around the World in 80 Dinners, originally published in 1959. Paddy died in October 1964.

Paddy's Clam House, 215 W. 34th St., is one of the largest and oldest seafood establishments in New York. Paddy (Joseph Patrick) White opened his first clam house in the Bronx more than 60 years ago and moved to the present location 26 years ago. He is now 80 and engaged in writing a book to be titled Eat Fish, Live Longer.
Paddy, born in Philadelphia, learned his trade at the oyster bar of Delmonico's. He still maintains that Lorenzo Delmonico was the greatest restaurateur of all time. Paddy established a record 59 years ago for opening clams  100 in 3 minutes, 20 seconds and claims this record has never been beaten. Today, his West 34th St. restaurant serves 1,000 people daily; disposes of 5,000 lobsters, 50 bushels of shellfish and 1,700 pounds of fish per week. The restaurant features wooden-topped tables and makes no pretensions to elegant service or appointments. And, Paddy boasts, people stand in line for his $2.55 five-course lobster dinner on Sundays.
Paddy is an avid fight fan, has known all the champs, and used to travel around the country to catch all the big fights of the past half century.

16 comments:

  1. If I'm on a retainer, I think I should get lunch for nothing.

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  2. I saw a card just like this on eBay only last night, and was struck by the surrealistic "floating sign". (and the peculiar absence of any details surrounding the building) Neat-o!

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  3. Alan, you're right. I'll meet you there for lunch today...and I'm paying.

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  4. Of course, Pamela...although perhaps we should just find a clam hut in San Francisco.

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  5. That picture is so strange. I wonder what it really looked like.

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  6. Let's see: first course-lemon, second course-butter, third course-lobster, fourth course-beer. fifth course-napkins... That is indeed one fine cantilever of a sign, made me think of the Russian Constructivist El-Lissitsky's 'Sky Hook/Cloud Hanger' projects.

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  7. Nice piece of NYC history. Love the connection to Delmonico's.

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  8. I'm eating leftover Taco Bell and you're making me hungry. Lobster....ahhhh!

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  9. I Googled the address and it seems to be one of the few blocks in NYC without a Google street view. Only a block from Macy's amid all the high buildings, so the floating sign is the least strangeness. Paddy's Clam House seems in outer space!

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  10. It is nice to see this card on the site. Paddy was my great grandfather. I never knew him, as he died before I was born. However, we ate there weekly--my grandmother took over operating the restaurant after his death--and I heard many stories from customers, friends, and relatives alike. My family sold the restaurant in the late seventies, but the new owners were not able to keep it open much longer. Today, the building where Paddy's had been is gone, but the memories live on.

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  11. My father bought Paddy's Clam house in the late 70's and I have fond memories of growing up there.

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  12. My grandpa, Sam Rothman worked at Paddy's Clam House from the 1950's until the day he died. My grandpa was on his way to work there at Paddy's when he suffered a massive heart attack and died on the street after coming out of the subway. I will never forget that fateful day on March 30, 1976, just 10 days before my 6th birthday. My grandfather was such a good man, everyone loved him. He was a waiter and became a manager at Paddy's. My grandfather spent many of dark morning with the Paddy's van purchasing fresh fish from the Fulton Fish Market. Love you Grandpa! (Sept 5, 1918 - Mar 30, 1976)

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